Why Blockchain?

Cryptocurrencies are just the first manifestation of this new technological paradigm.

All industries operate with chained processes in which different players participate, integrating the final product through value added. The complexity of these processes determined the need for standardization to make them reliable. Along with this started the first “traceability” protocols to ensure the provenance of products and processes applied.

The systems that have been implemented for many years require a large amount of documentation and bureaucracy, but the proliferation of data and information capture technologies allows us to think of systems that greatly improve productivity and efficiency in this regard.

Blockchain is presented as an ideal tool to combine and improve these processes due to the way it organizes information in unalterable and chronological databases. Thanks to cryptographic techniques, it is impossible to modify the entered data, which is also distributed in a decentralized way, making the system even more solid. The data is entered chronologically, that is, it works as a kind of open, public accounting book in which the 

information is not housed in one place (as is the case with traditional centralized databases) but in many places at the same time, being constantly validated by all network members. These characteristics make the blockchain an ideal tool to “trace” the path of a product throughout its production and distribution process, a way to digitally certify the main milestones and characteristics of that product.

Why Blockchain?

Cryptocurrencies are just the first manifestation of this new technological paradigm.

All industries operate with chained processes in which different players participate, integrating the final product through value added. The complexity of these processes determined the need for standardization to make them reliable. Along with this started the first “traceability” protocols to ensure the provenance of products and processes applied.

The systems that have been implemented for many years require a large amount of documentation and bureaucracy, but the proliferation of data and information capture technologies allows us to think of systems that greatly improve productivity and efficiency in this regard.

Blockchain is presented as an ideal tool to combine and improve these processes due to the way it organizes information in unalterable and chronological databases. Thanks to cryptographic techniques, it is impossible to modify the entered data, which is also distributed in a decentralized way, making the system even more solid.

The data is entered chronologically, that is, it works as a kind of open, public accounting book in which the information is not housed in one place (as is the case with traditional centralized databases) but in many places at the same time, being constantly validated by all network members.

These characteristics make the blockchain an ideal tool to “trace” the path of a product throughout its production and distribution process, a way to digitally certify the main milestones and characteristics of that product.